The Grampians

The Grampians National Park is one of the world’s oldest and most spectacular mountain ranges. Made up of a series of five sandstone ridges, together the Grampians form one of the most remarkable natural protrusions in Australia.

Located three hour’s drive north west of Melbourne, this impressive range was formed a result of the earth’s movements over thousands of years. Solid sandstone shifted and lifted to create a beautifully rugged landscape of peaks and valleys.
The Grampians National Park has earned a place on the Australian National Heritage List for its striking natural beauty, cultural values and abundance native flora and fauna. Keep an eye out for kangaroos, koalas, emus and an array of birdlife.

The park is recognised as one of the richest Aboriginal rock art sites in south-eastern Australia. As you explore the park, you’ll come across this visual evidence of the Aboriginal people's long association with the Grampians. Gariwerd, (the traditional name for the Grampians) is at the heart of the creation stories told by the Jardwadjali and Djab Wurrung indigenous people who have lived in the region for thousands of years.

The Grampians is also home to one of Victoria's largest waterfalls, MacKenzie Falls. This spectacular waterfall is the only waterway in the region that flows all year round. Its beautiful rainbow mist sprays high above a stunning gorge and water cascades gracefully over the huge cliffs and into a deep pool – a breathtaking sight!

View all related tours

1 of 12 Melbourne sights